• Farmers

    American farmers stand ready to meet the needs of the growing population and are dedicated to feeding you and your family. Products we use every day come from plants and animals cared for by America’s farmers.

     
  • Families

    Farming is a tradition that has been passed down for generations. Today’s farmers are committed to preserving and enhancing this tradition for generations to come. Farm Bureau is a strong voice because of families who join this organization and come together as a unified voice for agriculture.

     
  • Food

    Minnesota farmers ensure safe food choices for Minnesota families. As farmers, our job is to provide consumers with the highest quality, healthiest food possible. Growing and raising wholesome, safe food is our goal.

     

Welcome to the Minnesota Farm Bureau

 

Farm Bureau is an organization guided and directed by our nearly 30,000 member families – teachers, farmers, community leaders, husbands, wives, parents and business owners. Each one is concerned about their children, families, communities and making Minnesota a great place to live and work.

 

We exist to serve members because we share the values they hold dear – hard work, love of community, passion for the land and belief rooted in faith and family. Our services, programs and benefits are rooted in the cause, concerns and needs that are important to our members based on their beliefs and values.

 

To learn more about Farm Bureau, click here.

 

Latest News

 

Minnesota Farm Bureau
Minnesota Farm Bureau
Tuesday, April 15, 2014

American Farm Bureau’s Stallman Calls for Tax Changes

Farmers and ranchers need tax certainty to thrive in a modern economy, and making permanent deductions that expired in 2013 is a good first step, the American Farm Bureau Federation told the House Ways and Means Committee today.

 

“One of the major goals of tax reform should be to provide stable, predictable rules for businesses so that they can grow and create jobs,” American Farm Bureau President Bob Stallman said. “Farm Bureau believes that Congress should end its practice of extending important business tax provisions for one or two years at a time. This practice makes it very difficult for farmers and ranchers to plan and adds immense confusion and complexity.”

 

Stallman addressed the committee as part of a hearing addressing the economic disruption caused by the end of a series of tax deductions over the past several years. Committee Chairman Dave Camp (R-Mich.) recently introduced a discussion draft of the Tax Reform Act of 2014 in an effort to stimulate discussion of how the tax code could be simpler and fairer, while at the same time aiding economic growth, job creation and wages.

 

In written testimony submitted to the Committee, Stallman called for extensions of several now-expired deductions to benefit the economy as a whole, including:

  • Section 179 expensing, which allows small businesses to write off immediately capital investments of as much as $500,000 instead of depreciating them over several years;
  • Bonus depreciation, which is an additional 50 percent bonus depreciation for the purchase of new capital assets, including agricultural equipment;
  • Cellulosic Biofuel Producer Tax Credit: a $1.01 per gallon income tax credit for cellulosic biofuel sold for fuel plus an additional first-year, 50-percent bonus depreciation for cellulosic biofuel production facilities;
  • A $1.00 per-gallon tax credit for production of biodiesel and renewable diesel fuels;
  • The Community and Distributed Wind Investment Tax Credit, which gives the option to take an investment tax credit in lieu of the Production Tax Credit and
  • A provision encouraging donations of conservations casements.

 

Stallman reiterated the importance of Section 179’s immediate expensing to farming. “Farming and ranching is a capital intensive business,” he said. “In order to remain profitable and be competitive, farm equipment, buildings, and storage facilities must be continually upgraded and replaced. This provision allows agricultural producers to reduce maintenance costs, take advantage of labor-saving advances, become more energy efficient and adopt technology that is environmentally friendly.

 

“Smart business planning that anticipates and budgets for annual capital improvements proves challenging for farmers and ranchers because they operate on tight profit margins. The immediate expensing provided by Section 179 allows farmers and ranchers to cash flow purchases that otherwise might be delayed or incur debt expense that impact profitability.”

 

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